20060519-083 Messerschmitt Foundation - Messerschmitt Me-262A-1C Schwalbe Replica (D-IMTT) Berlin DE.jpg #2788 LVA - Farman HF.20 Replica (LA-2)Thumbnails#1329 Swedish Ship "Götheborg" (Sail Amsterdam 2010)
Messerschmitt Me-262A-1c Schwalbe (Swallow) replica (D-IMTT / 501244)
from the Messerschmitt Stiftung (Messerschmitt Foundation) at the ILA 2006, Berlin-Schönefeld (Germany)
(Internationale Luftfahrt-Ausstellung, ILA or International Aviation Exhibition - also known as Berlin Air Show)

The Messerschmitt Me-262 Schwalbe (Swallow) of Nazi Germany was the world's first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft. Design work started before World War II began, but engine problems and top-level interference kept the aircraft from operational status with the Luftwaffe until mid-1944. Heavily armed, it was faster than any other Allied fighters, including the British jet-powered Gloster Meteor. One of the most advanced aviation designs in operational use during World War II, the Me-262 was used in a variety of roles, including light bomber, reconnaissance, and even experimental night fighter versions. Me-262 pilots claimed a total of 542 Allied kills, although higher claims are sometimes made. The Allies countered its potential effectiveness in the air by attacking the aircraft on the ground and during takeoff and landing. Engine reliability problems, from the pioneering nature of its Junkers Jumo 004 axial-flow turbojet engines (the first ones ever placed in mass production) and attacks by Allied forces on fuel supplies during the deteriorating late-war situation also reduced the effectiveness of the aircraft as a fighting force. In the end, the Me-262 had a negligible impact on the course of the war as a result of its late introduction and the consequently small numbers put in operational service. While German use of the aircraft ended with the close of the Second World War, a small number were operated by the Czechoslovak Air Force until 1951. Captured Me-262 were studied and flight tested by the major powers, and ultimately influenced the designs of a number of post-war aircraft such as the North American F-86 Sabre and Boeing B-47 Stratojet. A number of aircraft have survived on static display in museums,
and there have also been several privately built flying reproductions.

In January 2003, the American Me-262 Project, based in Everett, Washington, completed flight testing to allow the delivery of near-exact reproductions of several versions of the Me-262 including at least two B-1c two-seater variants, one A-1c single seater and two "convertibles" that could be switched between the A-1c and B-1c configurations. All are powered by General Electric CJ610 engines and feature additional safety features, such as upgraded brakes and strengthened landing gear. The "c" suffix refers to the new General Electric CJ610 (a non-afterburning turbojet engine derived from the military J85) powerplant and has been informally assigned with the approval of the Messerschmitt Foundation in Germany (the Werk Number of the reproductions picked up where the last wartime produced Me-262 left off – a continuous airframe serial number run with a 50-year production break). Flight testing of the first newly manufactured Me 262A-1c (single-seat) variant (Werk Number 501244) was completed in August 2005. The first of these machines (Werk Number 501241) went to a private owner in the southwestern United States, while the second (Werk Number 501244) was delivered to the Messerschmitt Foundation at Manching, Germany. This aircraft conducted a private test flight in late April 2006, and made its public debut in May at the ILA 2006. The new Me-262 flew during the public flight demonstrations.
Exif Metadata
OLYMPUS CORPORATION C770UZ
f/4
63 mm
1/500 s
64
0.0 EV
no, mode: supressed
Maker
OLYMPUS CORPORATION
Model
C770UZ
Date Time of Original
2006:05:19 14:52:56
Aperture Number
4
Exposure compensation
0.0 EV
Exposure Time
1/500 s
Flash
no, mode: supressed
ISO
64
Focal Length
63 mm
White Balancing
auto
Exposure Mode
auto
Exposure Metering Mode
pattern
Exposure Program
creative
Light Source
unknown
Contrast
normal
Saturation
normal
Sharpness
normal