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#5751 US Air Force - Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (05-5142)

20190614-088 US Air Force - Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (05-5142) Volkel NL.jpg #5752 US Air Force - Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (05-5142)Thumbnails#5750 US Air Force - Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (05-5142)

Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (05-5142) from the U.S. Air Force (AFRC) at the Royal Netherlands Air Force Open Days 2019, Volkel (the Netherlands)

The Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) is a Major Command (MAJCOM) of the United States Air Force, with its headquarters at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. It is the federal Air Reserve Component (ARC) of the U.S. Air Force, consisting of commissioned officers and enlisted airmen. AFRC supports the Air Force mission to defend the United States through the control and exploitation of air and space by supporting Global Engagement. AFRC also plays an integral role in the day-to-day Air Force mission and is not strictly a force held in reserve for possible war or contingency operations.

The 452nd Air Mobility Wing (452 AMW) is an Air Reserve Component of the United States Air Force. It is assigned to the Fourth Air Force, Air Force Reserve Command, stationed at March Air Reserve Base, California. If mobilized, the Wing is gained by the Air Mobility Command.

The Boeing C-17 Globemaster III is a large military transport aircraft. It was developed for the United States Air Force (USAF) from the 1980s to the early 1990s by McDonnell Douglas. The C-17 carries forward the name of two previous piston-engined military cargo aircraft, the Douglas C-74 Globemaster and the Douglas C-124 Globemaster II. The C-17 commonly performs tactical and strategic airlift missions, transporting troops and cargo throughout the world; additional roles include medical evacuation and airdrop duties. It was designed to replace the Lockheed C-141 Starlifter, and also fulfill some of the duties of the Lockheed C-5 Galaxy, freeing the C-5 fleet for outsize cargo. Boeing, which merged with McDonnell Douglas in 1997, continued to manufacture C-17s for export customers following the end of deliveries to the U.S. Air Force. Aside from the United States, the C-17 is in service with the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, NATO Heavy Airlift Wing, India, and Kuwait. The final C-17 was completed at the Long Beach, California plant and flown on 29 November 2015.

Each year the Netherlands armed forces services organises open days on a rotational basis. Open days are intended to show how the Netherlands Defence organisation works for peace and security throughout the world. On these days everyone is welcome to have a look behind the scenes.
The 2019 Royal Netherlands Air Force Open Days took place at Volkel Air Base, home to 312 and 313 F-16 Fighting Falcon squadrons.